Slovenian Sips

With National Orange Wine Day happening earlier this month, I’ve taken the liberty of drinking more skin contact wine to ring in fall (or as much “fall” as we could get down in Miami). My latest orange sipper was Movia’s Rebula Ribolla 2015.

This wine comes from Slovenia—one of the most ancient winemaking cultures in all of Europe. Its history dates to the Celts and Illyrians tribes, well before the Romans had any influence on France, Spain, or Germany. From the Brda municipality in western Slovenia, the estate is located along the strip of land that adjoins the Italian and the Slovenian sides of the Collio.

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This wine is made by the Kristančič family, who purchased the estate in 1820, and is currently run by Aleš Kristancic. Aleš grew up in the vineyards and winery, helping his father transfer wines from barrel to barrel. Today, he implements his family’s rigorous biodynamic principles while experimenting to produce wines of unprecedented purity and authenticity.

The name Ribolla (in Italian) stems from “ribollire,” meaning to re-boil. The Bora wind in the littoral cooled the cellars before the wine must rich in sugars was able to fully ferment, stopping fermentation, only for the wine to then “re-boil” in the spring.

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The wine is 100% Rebula and very short skin contact gives the wine an amber hue. It has a strong nose of ripe apricot, honeysuckle, and orange peel. It wasn’t as funky as I had anticipated on the mouth, like some of the others I’ve had near the Collio appellation of Italy’s Friuli (which is a skip away). There was some nuttiness, nectarine, and candied lemon. It had a nice amount of acidity and was 12.5% in alcohol. I drank the wine now, but I read it could be enjoyed until 2025. I got it at a local wine shop for around $30, but I saw it online for about the same. I paired it with a post-work destress moment on the couch with my pooch.

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